November 20, 2006

Land transfer, easements OK’d for roundabout
Residents approved the transfer of land and easements at Willow Springs Learning Center that will allow the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (DOT) to move ahead with plans to install a roundabout.

DOT identified traffic concerns near Highway 74 and Town Line Road due to heavy volume, traffic speed, unusual road configuration and multiple driveway entrances. The department planned to address the issues by constructing a roundabout, a round junction at which traffic streams around a central island.

Before the project could proceed, DOT needed easements and access along the northwest side of the Willow Springs property and offered the district fair market value of $55,700 for property transfers and easements. Because all school district land transfers must be approved by voters, a Special Annual Meeting was scheduled.

While the 15 residents who attended the meeting voted unanimously to approve the transfers and easements, DOT would have been able to gain access to the district property through condemnation. The district worked cooperatively with DOT to ensure that the design of the roundabout incorporates safety factors, such as a turning lane for busses and other traffic issues specific to the school.

DOT has indicated the roundabout will be constructed in 2007. There are no anticipated costs to the district for construction of the roundabout.

Templeton Bulldog football has successful year
The establishment of the Templeton Middle School Bulldog Football Program exceeded expectations of the planners. Templeton Associate Principal Brad Hoffmann gave a report that summarized the Bulldog’s first season.

Some 131 seventh and eighth grade boys participated in one of four teams, each of which had two paid coaches along with parent volunteers. Hoffmann noted that many of the players who participated had never played football before. He said football brought students together both on and off the field.

The program was designed to be self-funded with plans to repay the district subsidy for start-up costs within three years. The program was able pay all start-up and operational costs in the first year and ended with a profit of $4,787. Revenues came from the $160 participation fee each player was charged, fundraising and concession sales. Expenses included more than $12,000 for coaches’ salaries and $31,974 for uniform and equipment purchases.

Hoffman said the program focused on understanding the game of football, proper techniques, sportsmanship and teamwork, articulation between the Bulldog and high school Charger programs, hard work, discipline and winning games.

School Board Member Lynn Kristensen, whose son participated in the program, said Bulldogs Football was a great addition to Templeton athletics. She said the right people were hired to coach and they built character in the players.

School Board Member Michael Hyland said he was pleased that 131 students joined the Bulldog program because students will have the opportunity to gain skills and make progress as they continue on to the high school teams.

“That’s the philosophy of successful programs,” he said.

Bulldog coaches recognized
At the beginning of the meeting, Hoffmann presented the Bulldog coaches for recognition. They included Sean Gissal, Shannon Flaherty, Chuck Emons, Tom Blackwell, John Krenek, Josh Klimas, Dan Klein, Richard Brown, Ken Schiedemeyer, John Kinlen and George Papachristou.

Woodside parent honored for health room help
Woodside Elementary School Principal Linda Jorgensen recognized parent Terri Schiedemeyer for coordinating volunteers in the school’s health room.

Multicultural activities, Chapter 220 report given
Chapter 220 Coordinator Erica Bova-Brown updated the School Board on the status of the Chapter 220 Integration Program and multicultural activities within the district.

Chapter 220 is a voluntary integration program between Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) and suburban school districts. A total of 104 Milwaukee students attend in the district: 49 at Hamilton, 33 at Templeton, 14 at Lannon and eight at Woodside. Five resident students attend MPS schools.

Bova-Brown highlighted numerous activities that are offered to students. She said her focus would shift in the coming year to ensure that minority students have equal access to Advanced Placement courses and college preparation. She said she will begin discussions with students in middle school so that they understand what they need to do to prepare for rigorous college-prep courses.

She noted that other suburban districts were examining the achievement gap between white and minority students.

“We’re all on the same page in closing the gap,” she said.

Server purchase OK’d for data backup
School Board members approved spending $52,300 to purchase hardware and software from Tech Upgrades. The purchases will allow the district to effectively back up information for data recovery, increase network resiliency and decrease hardware replacement costs, according to a memo from Instructional Technology and Assessment Coordinator Katherine Little.