January 4, 2000

School Board members approved an update of the district’s social studies curriculum. Instructional Services Supervisor Dee Bauman presented the social studies curriculum document that a representative committee of teachers had reviewed and revised over the past year.

The revised document aligns with the Wisconsin Model Academic Standards for Social Studies. Each grade level or course contains performance standards for each of the five social studies content standards. The content standards state that Wisconsin students will learn about:

  • geography through the study of the relationships among people, places and environments;
  • Wisconsin, U.S. and world history by examining change and continuity over time to develop historical perspective, explain historical relationships and analyze issues that affect the present and the future;
  • political science and political systems necessary for developing individual civic responsibility by studying the history and contemporary uses of power, authority and governance;
  • production, distribution, exchange and consumption so they can make informed economic decisions;
  • behavioral sciences by exploring concepts from sociology — the study of interaction among individuals, groups and institutions, psychology — the study of factors that influence individual identity and learning, and anthropology — the study of cultures in various times and settings.

School Board member Kary Cumming asked if the district was doing enough in the area of economics. Bauman said economics was incorporated in all the social studies content areas. Bauman said a junior level course was modified to provide half a credit in economics with the other half focused on citizenship.

Supt. Kathleen Cooke commented that teachers spent various in-service and early release days to work on aligning the social studies curriculum to the state standards.

School Board member Dawn Van Aacken complimented the team that worked on the project. She said identifying the state standards that pertain and then determining when and how those standards are addressed through the curriculum is a difficult undertaking.

Foundation director honored

Hamilton Education Foundation Volunteer Executive Director Anita Weier was presented with a community recognition plaque for her service to the district. Cooke described Weier as a tireless volunteer who works for the good of children.

Swim cooperative approved

Participation in a cooperative with the Menomonee Falls School District to allow Hamilton male students to participate in Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association Swimming Program was approved. The district pays half the cost of offering the program so Hamilton students are able to compete in a high school swim program. Hamilton does not offer a swim program because it does not have a pool. A similar cooperative is provided for female swimmers.

Course catalog changes made

Revisions were made to the 2000-2001 high school course catalog. Among the most significant changes was the addition of course descriptions that better describe what students will learn.