Hamilton choirs present final concert

The Hamilton High School Concert Choir will conclude an exciting year by presenting its final concert May 27 at 7 p.m. in the Hamilton Fine Arts Center.

Nearly twice the size as last year’s ensemble, the group has come a long way in developing its musical abilities through a variety of performances throughout the year. With music ranging from jazz and classical to Broadway and rock, the final concert of 2009 is sure to provide great entertainment for all.

In addition to the concert choir, the free concert will also feature Music Over Matter, the school’s a cappella ensemble, and the Hamilton Show Choir.

Choral Music Director Marilyn Spiess encourages community members to bring their family and friends to enjoy this final performance of the school year.

District efforts to prevent drug use

Question: I have heard rumors about incidents of student drug use. I do not know what to believe. Are drugs a problem among our students? What is the district doing to prevent these issues?

 

Answer: All schools that educate adolescents deal with issues regarding use of drugs and alcohol. While recent statewide statistics show a reduction in alcohol and drug use among students, schools must be vigilante in keeping the focus on prevention and applying consequences when students make bad choices.

In the Hamilton School District, we take a proactive stance to prevent alcohol and drug use and keep our students safe. You’ve probably seen notices for the “Get Connected” parent programs that are available. In fact, next year’s evening “Get Connected” workshops are determined and we would love to see you there. “All About Parenting” is another way we try to arm parents with information so they can help in the fight against alcohol and drugs.

Even more of our focus is on providing services for students. We offer classroom guidance, individual counseling, speakers and more – all in an effort to create a safe environment in which students will make wise, healthy choices.

There are rare instances when a student makes a poor choice. When a student is disciplined for any reason, the specific information is confidential. While parents may hear rumors, this is when they must trust that the issue will be taken care of in a timely and effective manner. School leaders are guided by School Board policy to determine what action to take in matters involving alcohol and drugs. It states:

No student may use, possess, distribute, sell or be under the influence of any quantity of drugs, inhalants or intoxicants while on school property, while involved in any school-related activity or while not on school property is such conduct endangers the property, health or safety of others at school or a school activity.

The possession, use, distribution, or sale of look-alike drugs, the misuse of products containing alcohol, and the possession of drug paraphernalia are prohibited. The distribution of prescription or over the counter medication is also prohibited.

Students who violate this policy, or refuse to submit to required breath testing for the presence of alcohol, shall be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with established procedures as well as referral to the appropriate law enforcement authorities.

May 16, 2005

School Board appoints new Special Services supervisor

The Hamilton School Board approved the appointment May 16 of Martha Freeman as the Special Services supervisor, contingent on contract release from her current employer. Freeman replaces Charlene DeGroot who will retire in June. Freeman will begin her position July 1.

“We are pleased to be able to hire an individual whose abilities and expertise will allow her to provide strong leadership in the Special Services Department,” Hamilton Superintendent Kathleen Cooke said. “Ms. Freeman is a highly collaborative problem-solver capable of working with divergent populations and cultivating creative solutions.”

For the past four years, Freeman was the Student Services director for the Greenfield School District. She had been a program support teacher in Greenfield before assuming the administrative post. She began her career in education in the Waukesha School District where she worked for 16 years in teaching positions and as a diagnostic teacher.
Freeman earned her bachelor’s degree in 1978 from Carthage College and her master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

District recognizes retirees for service to district

It was an evening for recognition and tribute as the Hamilton School Board honored 16 employees who have or will retire in the 2005-06 school year.

Superintendent Kathleen Cooke, Ph.D., provided descriptions of the retiree contributions to the district and their schools. The retirees were honored with a reception before the meeting
and gifts of a clock, Legislative plaque and a certificate from the Deparment of Public Instruction. The 2004-05 retirees are:

  • Harold Becker, district grounds keeper;
  • Barbara Berggren, Marcy administrative assistant;
  • Avis Dallman, Lannon administrative assistant;
  • Charlene DeGroot, Special Education supervisor;
  • Gloria Dutz, Hamilton library-media specialist;
  • Gloria Meleo Foster, school social worker;
  • Theresa Joers, Woodside first grade teacher;
  • Mary Kuether, Templeton guidance aide;
  • Dale Kuntz, Templeton associate principal;
  • Mary Mitter, Hamilton High School head cook;
  • Virginia Olson, district payroll supervisor;
  • Paul Peterson, Marcy fourth grade teacher;
  • Monica Ann Schulteis, Hamilton family and consumer education teacher;
  • Beverly J. Thielen, Woodside second grade teacher;
  • Ann Wegner, Templeton business technology instructor;
  • Charles Wickler, Maple Avenue Elementary School art teacher; and
  • Gerald Zirbel, school psychologist.

Community Service Award given to Wasser

Pauline Wasser, a Marcy, Templeton and Hamilton parent, was awarded with the 2005-06 Community Service Award for extraordinary contributions to the entire school district. Superintendent Cooke presented Wasser with the award thanking her for her role was a school volunteer and for providing leadership as a Home & School officer, referendum campaign committee member and legislative liaison on behalf of parents in the district.

Personnel changes OK’d

In personnel business, the School Board:

  • accepted the retirement request of Templeton guidance aide Mary Kuether, effective June 17;
  • appointed Melissa Sosic as a Woodside teacher, John Plese as a half-time Hamilton physical education teacher, Jennifer Schultz as a Marcy kindergarten teacher, and Marianne Baker as a part-time Lannon Early Reading Empowerment teacher; and
  • increased to full-time the contracts of Diane Paquette, Hamilton communcation arts teacher, from 83 percent and Ellen Acuff, Hamilton art teacher, from 33 percent.

School Board appoints new Special Services supervisor

The Hamilton School Board approved the appointment May 16 of Martha Freeman as the Special Services supervisor, contingent on contract release from her current employer. Freeman replaced Charlene DeGroot who will retire in June. Freeman will begin her position July 1.

“We are pleased to be able to hire an individual whose abilities and expertise will allow her to provide strong leadership in the Special Services Department,” Hamilton Superintendent Kathleen Cooke said. “Ms. Freeman is a highly collaborative problem-solver capable of working with divergent populations and cultivating creative solutions.”

For the past four years, Freeman was the Student Services director for the Greenfield School District. She had been a program support teacher in Greenfield before assuming the administrative post. She began her career in education in the Waukesha School District where she worked for 16 years in teaching positions and as a diagnostic teacher.

Freeman earned her bachelor’s degree in 1978 from Carthage College and her master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Charger Robotics holds assembly

Hamilton High School Charger Robotics will host a one-hour assembly May 20 beginning at 1:30 p.m. to showcase and explain the games involved with the increasingly popular high school activity. For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology (FIRST) is the world’s largest high school robotics competition. The program partners professionals and young people to solve an engineering design problem through intense competition.

The Charger Robotics team returned from a successful national competition in April with enthusiasm for building next year’s team. The assembly is planned to raise interest and awareness among students. In addition, the event will publicly acknowledge this year’s team achievements and recognize individual seniors, team leads and special guests.

The event will be in the gymnasium and features a FIRST competition field. In addition to the Hamilton team, Oconomowoc High School is sending its Cooney Robotics team to demonstrate the game.

Hamilton High School is located at W220 N6151 Town Line Rd., Sussex.

District to host Camp Invention for creative, science enrichment

Hamilton School District will host Camp Invention, a national summer day camp that encourages children to develop their innate creative abilities. The camp will be July 25-29 from 9 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. for children entering first through sixth grade in the 2005-2006 school year.

Camp Invention is designed to stimulate learning by providing children with hands-on, interactive activities that encourage creative solutions. The activities spark the imaginations of children while combining science, math, history and the arts — but most of all, fun.

Camp Invention is a project of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, a nationally recognized, non-profit resource center for creativity in Akron, Ohio. It is presented in partnership with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. It was introduced to Hamilton School District five years ago, and will be hosted in more than 40 Wisconsin communities this summer.

Jodi Rupnow, Maple Avenue Elementary School second grade teacher, is camp director. Chuck DuFrane, elementary Spectrum resource teacher, is assistant director. They will head up a staff of district teachers and local high school or college students who will serve as counselors. The camp features a low staff-camper ratio of one staff member for every eight campers.

“Camp Invention lets science come alive for campers and gets kids to think out of the box,” said Rupnow. “It is a challenging and fun-filled program for children of all academic abilities.”

The $199 registration fee lasts through May 31 with a cost of $179 if you sign up with a buddy. The price then goes to $209 through May 31. The fee includes instruction by licensed teachers, two daily snacks, all curriculum materials and a Camp Invention t-shirt. Call 1-800-968-4332 to register. For further information, visit www.campinvention.org.

Project Graduation gives seniors safe celebration

Hamilton High School 2005 seniors will have one last opportunity to celebrate their accomplishments as they participate in Project Graduation, an alcohol and drug free lock-in held at the school. The party begins at 8:30 p.m. on June 4, and runs until 4:30 a.m. the following day.

Students will enjoy music by DJ Express, karaoke, casino games, basketball and volleyball. Comedy Sportz, a hypnotist and the band “Ready, Steady, Go” will provide live entertainment. Great food and prizes are highlights as well.

Project Graduation began in 1989 when parents first organized the event. Seniors pay $25 for tickets to attend the event, but area businesses provide donations to offset the cost of the celebration. Seniors may purchase tickets during the school day in high school office B and during the senior yearbook distribution night on May 23.

The party is traditionally organized by parents of underclassmen so that the parents of seniors are able to plan for a busy graduation weekend.

Parent volunteers are needed to help make Project Graduation a success. For more information contact Pam Mehring at (262) 246-6827.

Lannon students to present patriotic program

Lannon Elementary School fourth- and fifth-graders are preparing for an exciting, patriotic performance May 19 beginning at 6:30 p.m. Their spring program, “Sing for the Red, White and Blue,” will be a mix of old patriotic favorites, along with new songs that pay tribute to our country and soldiers serving overseas. They also will perform, “When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again” on recorders.

Lannon music teacher Sara Hockerman promises that there will be “neat surprises in store.” The community is welcome to this free, enjoyable evening of music.

The performance is in the gymnasium at Lannon Elementary School, 7145 N. Lannon Rd., Lannon.

Hamilton announces April students of the month

Hamilton announces April students of the month
Hamilton High School students representing 11 curriculum areas were selected students of the month for April. They are:

    • Brian Bialobrzeski – business education;

    • Ashley Bulgrin – fitness education;
    • Nicole Destache – social studies;
    • Megan Fabus – family & consumer education;
    • Kristine Gielow – world languages;
    • Alexander Hintz – applied engineering and technology;
    • Janelle Nehs – music;
    • William Noelck – mathematics;
    • Ann Seward – art;
    • Stephanie Smith – communication arts;
    • Shawn Vergiels – communication arts; and
    • Erica Zander – science.

  • Hamilton AP statistic students hear from guest speakers

    Hamilton High School students in Penny Komatz’s Advanced Placement Statistics class heard from several guest speakers in April. The speakers illustrated how advanced statistical methods are used in research and to reach conclusions. The speakers also presented information to help students review for the Advanced Placement (AP)Test.

    Don Eastwood, a consulting manager with the Biostatistics Division of the Medical College of Wisconsin spoke April 14. He discussed:

    • careers that use statistics and how they differ in their use of them;
    • his educational background;
    • the statistical process that he uses as he guides doctors and researchers at the college;
    • how misanalysis of data has lead to problems at the Medical College, other Milwaukee colleges and for the Challenger disaster;
    • the Biostatics Division and program in which he works; and
    • likely topics on the AP test such as independence, power, Type I and Type II errors.

    Thomas Chelius, a biostatistician for the Medical College of Wisconsin spoke April 15. He discussed:

    • his background;
    • the field of biostatistics;
    • key knowledge to have to become a biostatistician;
    • aspects of epidemiology including its definition, history, case studies of specific diseases, fields, types of studies; and
    • studies in which he has been involved including the Women’s Health Initiatives.

    Chelius also had students design a study comparing the effectiveness of aspirin and Tylenol noting variables to be controlled and potential confounds.