Screening slated for preschoolers not in district programs

The Hamilton School District will offer preschool screening Sept. 8 and 9 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. for 3- and 4-year-olds who are not already enrolled in a district program and whose parents are concerned about their development.

The screening will occur at Willow Springs Learning Center, W220 N6660 Town Line Rd., Menomonee Falls. Call Claudia Guditus to arrange a screening at (262) 255-6190.

The screening process includes evaluation of language, hearing and articulation development. Parents should park in the west parking lot at Willow Springs when they arrive for their appointments.

Hamilton schools plan for start of classes

Hamilton School District students will begin classes Sept. 2. The district has compiled information to assist parents and students in preparation for the big day.

Registration — People who are new to the district may register their children at the school they will attend. Call the individual schools to learn their office hours. School phone numbers are:

  • Willow Springs Learning Center (4-year-old kindergarten), (262) 255-6190;
  • Lannon Elementary, (262) 255-6106;
  • Maple Avenue Elementary, (262) 246-4220;
  • Marcy Elementary, (262) 781-8283;
  • Woodside Elementary, (262) 820-1530;
  • Templeton Middle, (262) 246-6477; and
  • Hamilton High, (262) 246-6471.

If you are unsure of your school attendance area, call the district’s Public Information Office at (262) 246-1973 ext. 1100.

Kindergarten — The district offers three kindergarten programs.

4-year-old half day: To be eligible for the optional 4-year-old kindergarten program a child must be four years old by Sept. 1. The 4-year-old kindergarten program runs a half day — an 8:45 – 11:15 a.m. morning session and 12:45 – 3:15 p.m. afternoon session. Willow Springs Learning Center will have a brief K-4 orientation Aug. 27 at 5:30 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. to familiarize children with their bus route. School buses will pick up kindergartners at their home school and travel to Willow Springs. The school is mailing letters with specific times to K-4 parents.

5-year-old half day: To be eligible for the 5-year-old kindergarten program a child must be five years old by Sept. 1. The morning session is 8:35 – 11:25 a.m. and the afternoon session is 12:35 – 3:35 p.m.

5-year-old full day: The optional full-day kindergarten program is for students who turn five years old by Sept. 1. Full-day kindergartners will follow the same schedule as elementary grade school students.

Transportation — The bus company sends yellow postcards notifying bus riders of their routes. Postcards will be mailed the week of Aug. 25.

Breaks and last school day — Students will not have classes during Teachers’ Convention Oct. 30-31, Thanksgiving Break Nov. 26-28, Winter Break Dec. 24-Jan. 2, Staff In-service Jan. 22-23 and Feb. 27, Spring Break April 9-16 and Memorial Day May 31. Their last day of school is June 9.

School hours — Students in grades 1-5 and full-day kindergarten begin school at 8:35 a.m. and end at 3:25 p.m.; Templeton hours are 7:25 a.m. to 2:35 p.m.; and the high school runs from 7:20 a.m. to 2:25 p.m.

Immunization — Wisconsin law requires that parents provide updated records on their children’s immunizations including DTP, MMR and polio. The Hepatitis B (Hep B) vaccine is required for all students prekindergarten through 12th grades. The chicken pox vaccine is required for prekindergarten, kindergarten, first and second grade students.

School lunch program — The Hamilton food service staff is committed to producing quality meals that are nutritious and appealing to children. Lunches consist of five food items — meat, bread, two or more servings of fruit or vegetables, and milk. To reduce waste, children are offered an entire lunch but may refuse one or two items. The price for lunch remains the same whether a child takes the entire lunch or refuses an item.

Lunch menus will be listed in school newsletters, local newspapers, on the district web site and district cable television channel. Parents are asked to go over the lunch menu with their children to help them decide what to eat each day. Children should be encouraged to take at least a portion of an unfamiliar or unpopular food item.

Lunch prices for 2003-04 are: $1.60 for elementary students; $1.85 – middle school and high school students; $2.50 – adults; and 25 cents for milk.

Fees

The following are fees for the 2003-04 school year:
Pre-kindergarten and half-day kindergarten — $19*;
Elementary grades, full-day kindergarten and ungraded — $30*;
Middle school — $40*;
High school — $55*;
High school padlock and ID for new students — $5.50*
(*Maximum of $150 per family for these student fees.)
Drivers’ education behind-the-wheel training and theory-simulation — $92.50 each;
Templeton sports — $20 per sport ($60 family maximum);
Hamilton sports — $30 per sport ($90 maximum);
Templeton extra- and co-curriculars — $10 and $20;
Hamilton extra- and co-curriculars — $15 and $30;
Retake ID — $3.00;
Technology Fee — $20 per student ($40 family maximum); and
Parking — $80.

Cable television announcements — Residents who receive Time Warner Cable service in Sussex and Lisbon may tune into channel 13 for up-to-date information. School lunch menus, reminders about district events and local videos are broadcast.

District web site — The district web site is at www.hamilton.k12.wi.us. The site will be updated regularly with school supply lists, newsletters, calendar, lunch menus and current information.

For more information about the Hamilton School District, contact the individual schools or the district’s Public Information Office at 246-1973 ext. 1100.

Families can apply for free, reduced lunches

The Hamilton School District announced its policy for children unable to pay the full price of meals served under the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program, or milk served under the Special Milk Program. Each school office and the district office have copies of the policy for those who are interested.

Household size and income criteria determine eligibility. Children from families whose annual income is at or below the established levels are eligible for free and reduced price meals, or free milk if a split-session student does not have access to the school lunch or breakfast service.

Annual income maximum for free lunch or milk Household size — income maximum
1 — $11,674
2 — $15,756
3 — $19,838
4 — $23,920
5 — $28,002
6 — $32,084
7 — $36,166
8 — $40,248
For each additional household member, add $4,082

Annual income range for reduced lunch or milk Household size — income range
1 — $11,674.01 and $16,613
2 — $15,756.01 and $22,422
3 — $19,838.01 and $28,231
4 — $23,920.01 and $34,040
5 — $28,002.01 and $39,849
6 — $32,084.01 and $45,658
7 — $36,166.01 and $51,467
8 — $40,248.01 and $57,276
For each additional household member, add $4,082 to $5,809 to range

Monthly income maximum for free lunch or milk Household size — income maximum
1 — $973
2 — $1,313
3 — $1,654
4 — $1,994
5 — $2,334
6 — $2,674
7 — $3,014
8 — $3,354
For each additional household member, add $341

Monthly income range for reduced lunch or milk Household size — income range
1 — $973.01 and $1,385
2 — $1,313.01 and $1,869
3 — $1,654.01 and $2,353
4 — $1,994.01 and $2,837
5 — $2,334.01 and $3,321
6 — $2,674.01 and $3,805
7 — $3,014.01 and $4,289
8 — $3,354.01 and $4,773
For each additional household member, add $341 to $485 to range

Application forms are being sent to all homes with a notice to parents or guardians. To apply for free or reduced price meals or free milk, households must fill out the application and return it to the school. Additional copies are available in the principal’s office in each school. Applications may be submitted at any time during the year.

If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes and the household income falls at or below the levels shown above, the family should contact the school. Such changes may make households eligible for reduced price meals or free meals or milk, and they may reapply at that time.

In certain cases, foster children are also eligible for these benefits. If a household has foster children and wishes to apply for free or reduced price meals, the household should complete an application for a family of one or contact the school for more information.

The information provided by the household on the application is confidential. Under this program, no child will be discriminated against because of race, color, sex, national origin, age or disability.

July 21, 2003

Voters approve tax levy at Annual Meeting

Approximately 30 Hamilton School District residents approved the 2003-04 tax levy at the July 21 Annual Meeting. The 2003-04 budget totaled $36,537,387 with the local levy – the portion of the budget paid through local property taxes – amounting to $21,992,117.

With an anticipated increase of 39 additional students, the numbers represent a 3.81 percent increase in spending over last year’s budget of $35,196,764.

The proposed budget calls for a property tax rate of $11.70 per $1,000 of equalized value versus last year’s rate of $11.04 per $1,000 of value. The owner of property valued at $100,000 can expect to pay $1,170 – up from last year’s total of $1,104 – in property taxes to support schools.

This is a increase of 66 cents per $1,000 of property value, and includes debt service for the Marcy Elementary School addition-renovation project, Hamilton High School fine arts center addition and 2003-04 operations.

The state’s budget crisis had an impact on the Hamilton School District’s budget-building process this year. Normally, school districts rely on financial data from the state to determine their budgets. The state Legislature determines the amount of state aid districts will receive and caps the per pupil expenditure increase. To provide Hamilton citizens with the most up-to-date information regarding the tax levy, the School Board postponed the Annual Meeting from June 16 to July 21 in hopes that the state budget would be passed.

The state Assembly and Senate passed a budget that was forwarded to Governor James Doyle for his consideration. Before the Assembly-Senate was approved, the governor proposed a budget in April. The Hamilton School District built its budget on the Governor’s original proposal that required $551,000 of reductions to comply with current revenue caps. The Senate and Assembly budget would require the district to cut an additional $680,000 on top of cuts already made.

School officials believe that the levy presented to voters at the Annual Meeting is the maximum levy expected and might be lower when the state budget is finalized. The state Department of Public Instruction will verify revenue amounts in October. The district expects to make adjustments to the budget then.

The 2003-04 budget was broken down into revenues and expenses. Revenues are:

  • Local tax levy – 51.11%
  • State aids – 46.19%
  • Local aid – 1.67%
  • Interdistrict aid – 1.03%

Expenses are:

  • Salaries – 56.79%
  • Fringe benefits – 23.85%
  • Purchased services – 14.26%
  • Non-capital objects – 2.58%
  • Insurance & judgements – 0.87%
  • Capital objects – 1.11%
  • Debt retirement – 0.27%
  • Other objects – 0.26%

In addition to passing the tax levy, residents also approved three other resolutions that dealt with matters normally handled at the Annual Meeting.

Instead of suggesting an increase, School Board member Gerald Schmitz presented a motion to reduce the School Board annual salary about 10 percent — from $4,080 to $3,670. Schmitz said he felt that the difficult budget situation at the state and district level warranted the salary reduction. Waukesha County Supervisor and district resident Joe Marchese offered an amendment to reduce the board’s salary 25 percent, but the amendment did not pass. The 10-percent salary reduction was approved.

Voters also approved resolutions allowing School Board members to be reimbursed for expenses incurred while performing their duties and permitting the district to sell or dispose of surplus property.

Reading program highlighted at regular meeting

Instructional Services Supervisor Margaret Bauman, Ph.D., presented data about the success of the district’s Early Reading Empowerment Program that is designed to meet needs of children who experience difficulty as they learn to read.

Data from the 2002-03 Wisconsin Reading Comprehension Test shows that no students who had participated in the program when they were first-graders scored at the minimal level two years later. Proficiency levels on the test — in ascending order — are minimal, basic, proficient and advanced proficient. Two-thirds of ERE-served students scored at the proficent level, 19 percent were advanced proficient and 14 percent were at the basic level when they took the test which is given to all Wisconsin public school third-graders.

First grade teachers assess student in early fall to identify those in need of additional reading support. The children with the most significant needs are the first students served and most children “graduate frorm the program and additional students are then served.

All of ther district’s first grade, ERE and primary level special education teachers, along with reading specialists are ERE-trained. In addition to helping students one-on-one, teachers apply ERE strategies in their classrooms so that all student benefit from strong reading instruction.

Superintendent noted that Hamilton third-graders who scored in the proficient and advanced categories in creased from 76.7 percent in 1998-99 to 93.1 percent in 2002-03 which is the fourth highest percentage among Waukesha County school districts.

Personnel matters approved

In personnel matters, the School Board:

  • accepted the resignation of Templeton Learning Disabilities teacher Janet Brueggeman;
  • modified the writing resource teacher contracts of Sue Ladd from .7 to 1.0 full-time equivalency (FTE) and Elizabeth Flehmer from .8 to 1.0 FTE; and
  • appointed Toni Lynn Wainio as a Hamilton science teacher, Colleen Richards as a Maple Avenue guidance counselor intern, Melissa Burke as a Hamilton and Templeton transitions guidance counselor, Becky Bergemann as a Maple Avenue early childhood teacher, Nicole Farrar as a elementary teacher, Joanne Kubisch as Woodside teacher, Jennifer Reuter as a Maple Avenue physical education teacher, Melanie Moody as a replacement elementary teacher, Laura Vitale as a Woodside teacher aide, Beth Kauffeld as a part-time Woodside music teacher, and Kelly Flanagan as a Templeton communication arts and mathematics teacher.

Hamilton students take honors at workshop

A total of 18 Hamilton High School Lance yearbook staff members and their advisor came home with impressive awards from the 2003 Walsworth National Yearbook Workshop in Chicago.

The entire Lance staff, under the direction of editor Angela Runingen, earned first place for its theme package at the 3-day workshop.

Individual awards went to:

  • Pamela Arnold, first place for advanced design;
  • Sarah Eslyn, first place for beginning design; and
  • Jaclyn Millonzi, second place for beginning design.

Other Lance staff attending the conference with advisor Pam Mierow were Cassandra Voss, Chelsey Laper, Emily Gebhardt, Jami Kirchoff, Melissa Papenthien, Michelle Rick, Jennifer Doyle, Christina Zimmerman, Andrew Schroeder, Kayla Miller, Kaelyn Schwedler, Elizabeth Bertucci, Sarah Chojnacki and Kathryn Cook.

The students participated in the camp to learn basic yearbook skills and develop next year’s yearbook theme. Students learned about design, desktop publishing, theme development and editorial content.

Hamilton welcomes new-to-the-district students

Hamilton High School will welcome new-to-the-district students Aug. 5 with an ice cream social and student-parent orientation. The event is from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the library of the high school, W220 N6151 Town Line Rd., Sussex.

This program will acquaint students with the school, administration, staff and current Hamilton students. Parents will have an opportunity to have their questions answered and exchange ideas and information.

Invitations will be sent to new-to-the-district Hamilton High School students and their parents with an RSVP request. For more information, please call the high school at (262) 246-6471 ext. 1101.

Hamilton students take honors at workshop

A total of 18 Hamilton High School Lance yearbook staff members and their advisor came home with impressive awards from the 2003 Walsworth National Yearbook Workshop in Chicago.

The entire Lance staff, under the direction of editor Angela Runingen, earned first place for its theme package at the 3-day workshop.

Individual awards went to:

  • Pamela Arnold, first place for advanced design;
  • Sarah Eslyn, first place for beginning design; and
  • Jaclyn Millonzi, second place for beginning design.

Other Lance staff attending the conference with advisor Pam Mierow were Cassandra Voss, Chelsey Laper, Emily Gebhardt, Jami Kirchoff, Melissa Papenthien, Michelle Rick, Jennifer Doyle, Christina Zimmerman, Andrew Schroeder, Kayla Miller, Kaelyn Schwedler, Elizabeth Bertucci, Sarah Chojnacki and Kathryn Cook.

The students participated in the camp to learn basic yearbook skills and develop next year’s yearbook theme. Students learned about design, desktop publishing, theme development and editorial content.

Hamilton welcomes new-to-the-district students

Hamilton High School will welcome new-to-the-district students Aug. 5 with an ice cream social and student-parent orientation. The event is from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the library of the high school, W220 N6151 Town Line Rd., Sussex.

This program will acquaint students with the school, administration, staff and current Hamilton students. Parents will have an opportunity to have their questions answered and exchange ideas and information.

Invitations will be sent to new-to-the-district Hamilton High School students and their parents with an RSVP request. For more information, please call the high school at (262) 246-6471 ext. 1101.

Bielinski Homes recognized for $69,000 contribution

Hamilton High School principal David Furrer announced at a recent Hamilton School Board meeting that Bielinski Homes will donate $69,000 to support the school’s carpentry program. The School Board recognized the Waukesha-based company and two of its representatives for providing meaningful learning experiences for students.

The company agreed to fund a full-time teacher and provide funding for other construction class expenses in the 2003-04 school year.

For the past two years, Bielinski representatives have served on a school advisory committee that sought ways to support student learning through real-world experiences, including providing hands-on practice at sites in the Brandon Oaks subdivision.

“Bielinski Homes provided vision, creative problem-solving and demonstrated a deep desire to help our construction program grow and students learn,” Furrer said. “They assisted us in pursuing the dream of developing a new model of educating and preparing students for the future.”

Bielinski Chief Executive Officer Bob Brownell and Chief Operations Officer Paul Bielinski helped establish a partnership with the Southeastern Wisconsin Carpentry Joint Apprenticeship and Training Center. Located 12 minutes from Hamilton High School, the center will become the first satellite school setting for students. It provides a controlled environment where a high school construction teacher will join with a carpenter-trainer to teach students about safety, quality and productivity in the carpentry trade.

“It is a brilliant concept and one that Hamilton High School is committed to realizing,” Furrer said.

Superintendent Kathleen Cooke said if not for the generosity of Bielinski Homes, Hamilton would not have a carpentry program next year because of the state budget crisis that has caused the district to make cuts. After learning that the district would be unable to support a construction program without help, Bielinski representatives agreed to fund a full-time teaching position and classroom materials and equipment. The company will also continue to provide a home-building site where students can practice carpentry skills.

Cooke noted that the gift to the high school was only one of many contributions the company has made in the community.

In accepting the appreciation award, Brownell said that he has enjoyed working with Furrer and Cooke.

“Our contribution is a way to give back to the community and provides an avenue to allow some kids to work in the trades,” Brownell said. “It is a mutually beneficial relationship between Bielinski and the schools.”

Bielinski Homes recognized for $69,000 contribution

Hamilton High School principal David Furrer announced at a recent Hamilton School Board meeting that Bielinski Homes will donate $69,000 to support the school’s carpentry program. The School Board recognized the Waukesha-based company and two of its representatives for providing meaningful learning experiences for students.

The company agreed to fund a full-time teacher and provide funding for other construction class expenses in the 2003-04 school year.

For the past two years, Bielinski representatives have served on a school advisory committee that sought ways to support student learning through real-world experiences, including providing hands-on practice at sites in the Brandon Oaks subdivision.

“Bielinski Homes provided vision, creative problem-solving and demonstrated a deep desire to help our construction program grow and students learn,” Furrer said. “They assisted us in pursuing the dream of developing a new model of educating and preparing students for the future.”

Bielinski Chief Executive Officer Bob Brownell and Chief Operations Officer Paul Bielinski helped establish a partnership with the Southeastern Wisconsin Carpentry Joint Apprenticeship and Training Center. Located 12 minutes from Hamilton High School, the center will become the first satellite school setting for students. It provides a controlled environment where a high school construction teacher will join with a carpenter-trainer to teach students about safety, quality and productivity in the carpentry trade.

“It is a brilliant concept and one that Hamilton High School is committed to realizing,” Furrer said.

Superintendent Kathleen Cooke said if not for the generosity of Bielinski Homes, Hamilton would not have a carpentry program next year because of the state budget crisis that has caused the district to make cuts. After learning that the district would be unable to support a construction program without help, Bielinski representatives agreed to fund a full-time teaching position and classroom materials and equipment. The company will also continue to provide a home-building site where students can practice carpentry skills.

Cooke noted that the gift to the high school was only one of many contributions the company has made in the community.

In accepting the appreciation award, Brownell said that he has enjoyed working with Furrer and Cooke.

“Our contribution is a way to give back to the community and provides an avenue to allow some kids to work in the trades,” Brownell said. “It is a mutually beneficial relationship between Bielinski and the schools.”